Anthony Albanese wants Australian schools to teach about British settler massacres of Aboriginal people

Anthony Albanese expressed his support for schools teaching children about the massacres of Aboriginal people by British settlers.

The Prime Minister said it was important for children to learn the truth about Australia’s history, including the atrocities committed against some Indigenous communities.

“Part of learning our story is also telling the truth,” he said in an interview with 4BC radio’s breakfast show on Tuesday morning.

Anthony Albanese (pictured) expressed his support for schools to teach about the massacres committed against indigenous people by settlers

“And the truth is that indigenous people have suffered a lot. Not all, but many have. There were massacres (which) occurred.

“And we have to be honest about it. Not as a way to be shamed, but just as a fair dinkum. It’s the Australian way.

Mr Albanese said he supports lessons on atrocities committed against indigenous peoples being included in the national school curriculum.

His response was prompted after a discussion about Voice in Parliament, a body proposed to advise the federal parliament on issues affecting Indigenous peoples.

When asked about a potential date for a vote referendum, Mr Albanese said he was ‘still waiting for a consultation’.

“We know how difficult it is to organize a referendum. But it’s a pretty straightforward proposition,” he said.

“The Constitution is our national birth certificate. And at the moment, it is claimed that nothing happened until 1788.

“It’s good manners and it should be a source of pride to recognize that we shared this continent with the oldest continuous civilization on the planet.”

The Prime Minister explained that Australians needed to be 'truthful' about the past when it comes to the suffering endured by Indigenous communities, but not in a way that 'shames' others (pictured, 1852 lithograph of the Massacre of Waterloo Creek)

The Prime Minister explained that Australians needed to be ‘truthful’ about the past when it comes to the suffering endured by Indigenous communities, but not in a way that ‘shames’ others (pictured, 1852 lithograph of the Massacre of Waterloo Creek)

During his interview on 4BC radio, Mr Albanese was asked about the vote in Parliament and a potential date for a referendum, to which the Prime Minister said he

During his interview on 4BC radio, Mr Albanese was asked about the vote in Parliament and a potential date for a referendum, at which the Prime Minister said he was ‘still waiting to have a consultation’ (pictured , Mr. Albanese at the Garma Festival in North East Arnhem Land in July)

It comes as the first advertising campaign urging Australians to vote ‘yes’ for an Indigenous voice in Parliament was released on Monday.

The ad, which was shot near Alice Springs, features playwright and actor Pitjantjatjara and Nyungar Trevor Jamieson speaking to a group of Indigenous children seated in an outback setting, as around a campfire.

“I have a story to tell you. It’s a good one,” says Jamieson.

The first ad promoting a 'yes' vote in the upcoming referendum for an Indigenous voice in Parliament has been released

The first ad promoting a ‘yes’ vote in the upcoming referendum for an Indigenous voice in Parliament has been released

“It’s about how these people, the First Peoples, got a voice.”

Survey

Will you vote for an Indigenous voice in Parliament?

  • Yes 17 votes
  • Nope 251 votes
  • I do not know yet 10 votes

Scenes were then cut between an Asian grandmother cooking with her grandchildren and a father helping his son fix a bike as they talk at one point about how they proudly voted ‘yes’ in the referendum .

Jamieson then says that Indigenous people had “no voice”. No word to say on matters that concerned them. It was not good’.

The ad shows a crowd of grassroots people, mostly young people, supporting a ‘yes’ vote by texting, making phone calls, speaking in the street and getting tattoos.

“Everyone was walking side by side,” explains the old Asian woman.

“And that’s how we changed this country for the better, how we made history,” continues Jamieson.

‘Is this story true?’ one of the children asks Jamieson.

The ad stars Pitjantjatjara and Nyungar playwright and actor Trevor Jamieson as the

The ad features Pitjantjatjara and Nyungar playwright and actor Trevor Jamieson as the ‘storyteller’

What appears to be an Asian grandmother tells her children how she proudly voted for a vote in Parliament

What appears to be an Asian grandmother tells her children how she proudly voted for a vote in Parliament

With a wistful expression, Jamieson replies, “It could be.”

The ad ends with a caption of the new campaign slogan “History calls us” and a final pitch “Vote yes for a First Nations voice in Parliament”.

Uluru Dialogue co-chair Pat Anderson, who appears in the ad standing between two children, told The Guardian the advert encouraged Australians to talk about a better future.

“Silence never made history, and history calls,” she said.

“It’s up to all Australians to respond. We call on the nation to continue walking with us on this final stretch towards a brighter future.

Will Australians vote for an Indigenous voice in Parliament?

A poll by the Australia Institute in July found not only strong support for the vote, but also for it to be added to the constitution.

The poll found 65% would vote yes, down from 58% in the same poll in June.

Some 14% said they would vote no, with the remaining 21% undecided.

Support was highest among Green voters, but even 58% of those aligned with the Coalition would vote yes.

Some 59% of One Nation voters would vote yes, despite its leader Pauline Hanson leading the charge against him. This figure was 35% in June.

For a referendum to succeed, a majority of states must also vote yes, but the poll showed that was also easily covered.

The four largest states had comfortable majorities with Victoria at 71%, Queensland at 66%, WA at 63% and NSW at 62%.

Support was highest at 85% for Australians aged 18-29, but those over 50 were still above 50% yes.

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