Oil Paintings – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 02:32:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russellchatham.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2.png Oil Paintings – Russell Chatham http://russellchatham.com/ 32 32 Ordinary Beings, Fragmented Beliefs | Bis https://russellchatham.com/ordinary-beings-fragmented-beliefs-bis/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 00:52:11 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/ordinary-beings-fragmented-beliefs-bis/ he latest multimedia works by Haider Ali Jan, exhibited at the T2F gallery, initiated a conversation on various tangents to the stories, experiences and concerns of an ordinary man. Organized by the VASL Artists Association in Karachi, the exhibition included sculptures, paintings and printed works. The solo exhibition showed Jan’s lifelong interest in the events […]]]>

he latest multimedia works by Haider Ali Jan, exhibited at the T2F gallery, initiated a conversation on various tangents to the stories, experiences and concerns of an ordinary man.

Organized by the VASL Artists Association in Karachi, the exhibition included sculptures, paintings and printed works. The solo exhibition showed Jan’s lifelong interest in the events of everyday life, recalled, reimagined and reformed using his unique illustrative rendering style of creating visuals and volumes. Jan emphasizes that he doesn’t prepare to create new art forms with a particular goal in his head. The process is always based on his intuition. Once he’s caught a sparkle from his collection of archival documents, photographs and mundane objects, he puts on an apron.

The fluidity of expression, childlike designs and mark-making in his visuals portray a certain level of casualness and freedom to experiment with various juxtapositions of elements in unprescribed arrangements. Haider is incidentally inspired by the social thoughts of the French existentialist philosopher Henri Lefebvre on the “critique of everyday life”. All of this is reflected in the dialectical thinking he employs to lay down the fragmented code of vernacularism, which translates everyday situations and anecdotes into candid and pure visual expressions – not just a philosophical dilemma.

The unknowns in Jan’s sculptural works, the hybrid of unconscious entities of humans and invertebrates with extraordinarily elongated limbs and faceless life, are reminiscent of the figures in cave paintings made by Neanderthals — also the stylized figures of Aboriginal art from the Kimberleys. One of the figures is placed on a yellow four-legged chair (without the backrest) with long legs and arms holding a seasoned bamboo stick.

A detached and deformed hand mounted on top of the bamboo stick with a swollen finger, the title reads His finger hurts. As Jan explains, this is the familiar story of an ordinary person. A person who is most concerning, albeit momentarily, letting others know of their pain, doing nothing but sitting, whether out of naivety or ignorance.

Another exciting form shows a low bowing torso and extremely elaborate legs glued to a morah, a traditional round stool in hand-woven reed and yarn. The piece is titled Contemplate – interestingly, with no pair of eyes or indication of a brain. It denotes another reality, failing to come to a conclusion or decision – a commoner, a confused Confucius. The third and final sculpt in the series is a bizarre, lifeless figure with a whipped-back neck, seated in a regular chair in a very casual manner, with lots of abdominal fat showing. The seat is made of red rexine, an artificial leather-like fabric found in abundance in urban settings, restaurants, banks and public offices. The demographics or metaphors behind these odd characters and ordinary chairs/stools are unknown; one can intervene to decipher it more subjectively.

Photographs of ordinary places, spaces and objects are an integral part of Haider Ali Jan’s visual narratives. Sometimes he mixes them with computer-aided illustrations. On other occasions, he paints over large digital prints of these photographs. In a multimedia work, titled Expect, the small nameless black figures are painted over the photographs of usual red-brick residential apartments with typical balconies and windows.

Seemingly cheerful residents or members of the general public, in a festive mood, anticipate the arrival of a very, very important person (VVIP) – a political figure considered a messiah or foreign dignitary. Jan picked up on this daily global activity to pose a skeptical contemplation, because, despite all the multicolored flags and excitement, an event may not take place at all or may not bring the intended change in the lives of those who celebrate it. It’s a familiar high point in a commoner’s belief system.

As we approach another multimedia piece hanging on the wall, titled Pedestal, it feels like putting the pieces of a puzzle together. There is a photograph of a building under construction that looks like a portico – a single-story concrete ceiling on a few pillars. It appears to be half demolished even before its completion – another ordinary derelict sight in the newly developed suburb.

On closer inspection, one notices a random juxtaposition of body parts rendered in yellow. An oil painting of a girl’s head is placed on the roof. The detached but elaborate arms and legs are in a perpendicular view above and above the unfinished structure. The body parts are much larger in proportion to the building. There are surgical stitch marks on the neck and near the wrist on the left arm. A red bow hair clip, several picked flower petals and a few multicolored pennants are left at the exit as a symbol of victory. Suddenly, one can decode an uncomfortable comparison. Sometimes we have to settle for loose pixels in an image.

The work Tomb shows a wall cabinet from Jan’s old house which has since been demolished. He drew a piece of cloud, a two-pronged sword, fruit, a planter, and candles in various islands in the cabinet. At the lowest level, two legs lie side by side. There is a man’s bare foot and a woman’s foot with a shoe. A necklace of red beads binds the two legs. A horse-like donkey appears huddled behind the cabinet, wearing lipstick and having a holy foot – all in oil pastels on a digital print. There is a childlike sensibility in the work. Everyday objects and arrangements symbolize nostalgia. There is a perpetual impression on the artist – bearing on a virtual archive to converse with.

Haider Ali Jan’s new body of work explores the everyday beliefs and fragmented thoughts in our heads. We eventually realize that the “fragments” are waiting to be connected in a coherent line of thought and that each piece is essential to reach the scene. Ordinary Existence was exhibited at the T2F gallery, from August 24 to September 5.


The writer is an art/design critic. He heads the Visual Communication Design Department at Mariam Dawood School of Visual Arts & Design, Beaconhouse National University, Lahore.

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Lilou Li Xia makes her first solo debut in New York at YI GALLERY https://russellchatham.com/lilou-li-xia-makes-her-first-solo-debut-in-new-york-at-yi-gallery/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 21:57:54 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/lilou-li-xia-makes-her-first-solo-debut-in-new-york-at-yi-gallery/ LI XIA (绿李 LILOU OH YEAH) Lovers (February 14), 2021 Watercolor on paper, mounted on wood panelCourtesy of YI GALLERY and the artist “By magnifying small details, you may be able to see the truth.” Yi Gallery is pleased to present a new body of work by Lilou (Li Xia). This is the French-based artist’s […]]]>

LI XIA (绿李 LILOU OH YEAH) Lovers (February 14), 2021 Watercolor on paper, mounted on wood panel
Courtesy of YI GALLERY and the artist

“By magnifying small details, you may be able to see the truth.”

Yi Gallery is pleased to present a new body of work by Lilou (Li Xia). This is the French-based artist’s first solo exhibition in New York and his second exhibition with the gallery. A vernissage will take place on Saturday, September 24 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. The opening will coincide with Industry City’s second #ArtSaturday event.

Lilou’s images, while clearly figurative, are not overtly descriptive. She frames and explodes the mundane details of everyday life. In his images, calm moments of human interaction and scenes of domestic life, both realistic and imaginary, come to life: a banal lamp, a shopping list, amorous kisses, a bite of a fresh strawberry, people sharing fruit, a small piece of sticky tape. tape… All the seemingly insignificant details are magnified and explored with a touch of warm humour. Lilou’s paintings emanate from real life. Cinematically framing mundane details, his work invites the viewer into vignettes that capture the tension of familiar and neglected moments. “I think in pictures,” according to the artist, “I like to paint moments that don’t show cause and effect, before and after. They are in a state of flux. Also presented is a new series of ceramic works, in dialogue with the watercolors and oil paintings of the exhibition.

In Eye Contact – Butterfly Kiss (2022), a large oil on canvas painting and the show’s titular work, Lilou depicts the tender moment when the eyelashes of two kissing lovers gently touch, the two faces merging into one. ‘other. Here, subtly different colors are used to represent the skin tones of the two faces. As the artist states, “The color palette reminds me of Jiefangbei – People’s Liberation Monument in my hometown of Chongqing. This is where the two rivers, Yangtze and Jialing, meet. The two rivers have different colors, but when they merge they do not change each other’s colors.

LI XIA (绿李 LILOU OH YEAH) July (July), 2020 Watercolor on paper, mounted on wood panel
Courtesy of YI GALLERY and the artist

Lilou finished The Lovers (February 14), an intimate sized watercolor mounted on wood panel, on Valentine’s Day in 2021. This is a close up of an intimate moment – two lovers ears touching. Here, Lilou explores all the ability of paint to give fleeting moments, like this, a permanent visual representation. Close-ups are powerful, shortening the viewing distance, making the experience dynamic and intimate. For Lilou, growing in isolated frames leads her into a world close to meditation.

We may already be familiar with Lilou’s fictional subjects. For the artist, a character is only a signifier, and she intentionally omits representational details that may reveal the gender, racial, or social identity of her protagonists. The figures in his work do not look directly at the viewer. They look away. They are detached. It is very important to the artist that the objects and figures in his work remain in their most natural state. They don’t pose for anyone. They are not monitored. This world is an open space in which everyone can enter freely. In this world, bread dances, condensed milk express amorous discourse and objects pass through stages of personification. Precise and sensual, these meticulously constructed scenes are imbued with a sense of tranquility and surreal humor. Although it decidedly lacks a distinct plot in its narrative, Lilou leaves traces that suggest something just happened. Lilou’s photos don’t just record events, they capture feelings – emotions buried deep in our consciousness. These perfectly cropped scenes celebrate life’s analog, delightful, and sometimes forgotten moments. They act as a kind of visual fossil – proof of our human existence – how we live, work and love.

LI XIA (绿李 LILOU OH YEAH) Green Lamp, 2022 Watercolor on paper, mounted on wood panel
Courtesy of YI GALLERY and the artist

Li Xia, also known as 绿李 Lilou Oh Yeah (born 1991 in Chongqing, China), lives and works in Rouen, France. Lilou attended the University of Paris 1 Panthéon – Sorbonne (MFA, 2021), the Superior School of Art and Design Le Havre-Rouen (ESADHaR) (MFA, 2020) and the Institute of Fine Arts of Sichuan ( BFA, 2014). She has exhibited internationally at venues including LONG Museum, Minsheng Art Museum, Bananafish Gallery in Shanghai, China, Villa des Arts in Paris, France, and Rola Bola in Rouen, France. The YI GALLERY program features an international roster of emerging and mid-career artists. Launched in 2018 as a curatorial project exhibiting in non-traditional settings, the gallery has expanded to include a collaborative exhibition space in Bushwick (2020-2021). The gallery continues to evolve with a new space inside Brooklyn’s vibrant creative hub, Industry City, launching in 2021. YI is committed to providing a platform for distinctive artistic voices, while enhancing interaction of the public with contemporary art.

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At this year’s Russian-only Cosmoscow show, the artistic statements are subtle, but the anxiety is not https://russellchatham.com/at-this-years-russian-only-cosmoscow-show-the-artistic-statements-are-subtle-but-the-anxiety-is-not/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 20:48:37 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/at-this-years-russian-only-cosmoscow-show-the-artistic-statements-are-subtle-but-the-anxiety-is-not/ To participate Cosmos last year want to tap into the pulse of the Moscow art scene. Lines were long, performances pushed political boundaries and there was an industrial chic vibe, as well as the largest gallery attendance in the fair’s 10-year history. This year, however, exhibitors were down to 72 galleries (down from 80), and […]]]>

To participate Cosmos last year want to tap into the pulse of the Moscow art scene. Lines were long, performances pushed political boundaries and there was an industrial chic vibe, as well as the largest gallery attendance in the fair’s 10-year history. This year, however, exhibitors were down to 72 galleries (down from 80), and they were all Russian, although 13 booths featured work by international artists.

Due to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, I was unable to attend the fair in person (which ran from September 14-18). Instead, I reconnected with those merchants I had met in 2021 and asked a friend, Moscow-born cultural adviser Aleksei Afanasiev, to talk to new entrants in the field.

It is revealing that Art & Brut presented the tangy glitch-pop aesthetic of Ukrainian artist Alexander Zabolotny at the fair again this year, in a radically different context. His artist statement says, in part, “I’ve never been drawn to trauma (although I have to consider its inevitability).”

by Alexander Zabolotny Laocoon, polystyrene and acrylic. Photo: Courtesy of Art & Brut.

Zabolotny moved from his former studio in Russia to Turkey, but, according to gallery co-founder Irina Markman: “The current political crisis, while dreadful, has not severed our close relationship with Alexander.

Through my outreach, however, I discovered that the Fragment gallery, which was behind a pee performance at last year’s fair by artist Dagnini, has moved permanently to New York; Anna Dyulgerova, co-founder of Blazar, Cosmoscow’s affordable art satellite fair (September 13-19), moved to Berlin; and Nadya Kotova, an Antwerp dealer specializing in contemporary Russian art, chose not to participate in part because she was told by her Belgian peers that it would be interpreted as support for Russia’s war against the Ukraine.

According to Cosmoscow founder Margarita Pushkina, going ahead with the fair was a collective decision, not an immediate one. The event only launched its call for entries in June. “Of course there were different opinions,” Pushkin said. “People commented on social media, noting that the entertainment nature of the event was inappropriate at this time.”

“However, it is important to understand that many people’s lives are professionally linked to the fair,” she added. “The response from our community has been very positive, and after a long time of reflection, our gallery owners and artists have plunged into the work.”

Vera Glazkova, who established Arka Gallery in 1995 in Vladivostok, a region bordering China and North Korea – and naturally focuses on the Asian market – agreed. “It’s important to keep working,” she explained of her decision to be one of a handful of galleries exhibiting at Cosmoscow for the first time.

Masha Lamzina, Cute balloons for a homeless dog (2022), wood, pyrography, wood stain, priced at $400 with Arka Gallery.

Drawing attention to its turf, the Arka Gallery presented delicate textiles and artful works in stained wood with shamanic motifs by young rising artist Masha Lamzina, which resonated with the mythological feel of Lyudmila Baronina’s illustration. Lubok-Works influenced by nearby Ural Vision. Also new to the fair is the Serene Gallery, which opened in Moscow in early April, showing Olya Aystreyh’s “Disappear Here” series of swirling paintings of a dissolving swimmer, inspired from the cult novel by Bret Easton Ellis. less than zero.

The decision whether or not to participate in the fair has been complicated for many dealers, and professionals in the art world tend to be divided on the effectiveness of cultural boycotts, as they make a country’s creative sphere pay. for the sins of a government. Olga Temnikova, from the Tallinn-based gallery Temnikova & Kasela, for example, decided not to participate in Cosmoscow this year because of the war. “But we are not canceling Russian culture in any way, because none of the artists or curators I know support the current regime,” she added, “and for this reason the opposition needs all our support”.

Olya Avstreyh, series “Disappear Here”, Swimmer III, oil canvas.

Aleksandr Blanar, a curator working with Shilo Gallery, another Cosmoscow newbie, said that “many artists wonder if they have the right to continue their activity, because there is a risk of clashes with the authorities if you Some artists secretly make statements about the war, while others simply continue their work as a distraction from reality.

The Artwin gallery took the opportunity to take a closer look at this reality by inviting a group of its artists to create new works for the fair. “It seems that the main concern for artists right now is issues of freedom and the ability to express one’s opinion,” said gallery owner Mariana Guber-Gogova. Its stand included works, such as framed mirrors with striped centers in fluorescent green by Evgeny Granilshchikov. “An attempt at declaration is possible even in a vacuum, and perhaps in this vacuum it is particularly important,” Guber-Gogova said. “We have never encountered censorship – the question is whether that will continue to be the case.”

Yet several artists have incorporated more overt statements into their work. There was Osip Toff’s sign art at the Ural Vision booth, which included fun phrases like “Yesterday is over”; Alexander Kipsone’s spray-painted canvas 14,600 days in the desert, which included the word ANGER in capital letters, on view at DiDi, a St. Petersburg gallery known for showing avant-garde artists of the 1950s; and textual iconographic compositions of Cosmoscow’s Artist of the Year Valery Chtak, which featured such phrases as “Only the truth” or “There is no choice.” Whether these works were considered subversive or not, their impact was too subtle to prompt a ban from government officials.

Alexander Kipson, 14,600 days in the desert (2021), mixed media on canvas. Photo: courtesy DiDi Gallery and the artist.

According to gallery owner Ekaterina Iragui, who has participated in Cosmoscow since the first edition, “contemporary art remains one of the rare independent resources to activate thought. What happens cannot be dictated or controlled. Although she admitted that there are cases of self-censorship by artists and art spaces in the country, the Cosmoscow fair is “the only free platform of such magnitude” for the Russian contemporary art scene. . “On opening night, the hugs were stronger than ever,” added Iragui. “I could feel that the relationships between people got stronger. Everyone was happy that such a platform still exists.

Other stars of the fair included Vladislav Efimov’s textural and meditative photographs of forests at Pennlab Gallery and Alexander Lemish’s tongue-in-cheek digital paintings such as Gemstone Pizza at Fabula Gallery, most of which have sold for up to $5,000. Kirill Gashan, known for his Soviet-style hyperrealism, showed his strikingBestiary series of animal portraits in haunting environments at the Szena gallery. Four of the works sold on the first day of the fair for between $6,000 and $12,000.

Vladislav Yefimov, Around the forest (2022), C-print, edition of 3 + 1AP. Photo: courtesy PENNLAB Gallery and the artist.

“I think now is a difficult time for young Russian artists, who can only count on financial support from within the country, which is very limited,” said Szena director Anastasia Shavlokhova. “The responsibility lies primarily with the galleries to act as micro-institutions, and not just to sell the works, but also to seek out fundraising opportunities and to carry out museum-quality exhibitions in their spaces.”

The digital sphere has brought new sources of funding to Cosmoscow, with online banking Tinkoff Private and Swiss technology company 4ARTechnologies (which has a collection of works by Andy Warhol, Kevin Abosh, Ai Weiwei and others), collaborating with local galleries and institutions on NFT.

The digital art section of the fair has also become a permanent feature (and not just a special project), curated by the artist collective Instigators. This year’s edition saw exciting themes such as the digitization of ancient skulls by Russian NFT artist Kirill Rave, and children’s toys considered early avatars, in a collaboration between Uzbek multimedia artist Denis Davydov and Georgian-American artist Uta Bekaia.

Alexander Lemish, Daddy Johns (2022), digital painting, c-print, acrylic composite, metal.

By many accounts, there was a strong local buzz about the fair this year, with public figures in attendance as well as the usual art world suspects, such as museum director Shalva Breus of the Breus Foundation. and the recently announced Museum of Contemporary Art in Tbilisi.

Sales were comparable to $2.7 million last year, indicating that Russian collectors still primarily buy Russian art. But with the recent resignation of the fair’s artistic director, Simon Rees of New Zealand, and overseas sponsors like Ruinart, Breguet and Audi withdrawing their funding, it remains to be seen how well Cosmoscow can cushion the impact of war on the country’s artistic community. And, in turn, how isolated this community will be from the international stage.

“The situation of Russian galleries in the international context has never been easy,” said Iragui, who participated in several international fairs this year, including NADA in New York and the upcoming Paris Internationale. “We cannot say that Russian galleries suddenly disappeared from fairs, because our role was never strong in the first place.

“The international artistic community has personally been very supportive of me,” Iragui added, “and I can say that personal connections prevail over mainstream or government-led opinions.”

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Announced, then forgotten; “Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered” at the American Folk Art Museum – West Side Rag https://russellchatham.com/announced-then-forgotten-morris-hirshfield-rediscovered-at-the-american-folk-art-museum-west-side-rag/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 19:40:08 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/announced-then-forgotten-morris-hirshfield-rediscovered-at-the-american-folk-art-museum-west-side-rag/ Morris Hirshfield (1872, Poland–1946, United States) ‘Angora Cat’, 1937–1939 Oil on cardboard on canvas 22 1/8 x 27 1/4 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Sidney and Harriet Janis Recueil, 1967, 607.1967. © 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for the Estate of Morris Hirshfield / Licensed by VAGA to Artists Rights Society […]]]>
Morris Hirshfield (1872, Poland–1946, United States) ‘Angora Cat’, 1937–1939 Oil on cardboard on canvas 22 1/8 x 27 1/4 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Sidney and Harriet Janis Recueil, 1967, 607.1967. © 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for the Estate of Morris Hirshfield / Licensed by VAGA to Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.

By Wendy Blake

In 1939, Morris Hirshfield, a retired tailor and “foot appliance consultant” from Bensonhurst, visited the Brooklyn Museum to show the curator two paintings – his only two. The unschooled artist, who started making art at the age of 65, unveiled a photo of an oversized angora cat with a piercing stare, and another with a girl against a blue ‘beach’ with an extravagant texture.

Morris Hirshfield (1872, Poland-1946, USA) “Beach Girl”, 1937-1939. Oil on canvas, 36 1/4 x 22 1/4 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection, 1967, 2097.1967. © 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for the Estate of Morris Hirshfield / Licensed by VAGA to Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.

Later that year, Hirshfield’s work was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art – a stunning achievement for an unknown self-taught artist. It was adopted by avant-garde luminaries of the time, such as Picasso, Marcel Duchamp and André Breton. In 1943 he became the first self-taught artist to have a solo exhibition at MoMA, which caused a storm of controversy.

Morris Hirshfield’s work fell into relative obscurity soon after, with the influential painter generally dismissed by the establishment as merely “primitive”. A new exhibition at the American Folk Art Museum, “Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered” – which brings together more than 40 of the artist’s works (more than half of his production) – aims to restore him to his rightful place as a revolutionary member of the 20th-century avant-garde. The exhibition was curated by Richard Meyer, Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor of Art History at Stanford University, who has published a refreshing and accessible book, “Master of the Two Left Feet: Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered”. .

Morris Hirshfield (1872, Poland–1946, USA), Girl with Pigeons, 1942, Oil on canvas, 30 x 40 1/8 inches, The Museum of Modern Art, 610.1967. © 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for the Estate of Morris Hirshfield, licensed to VAGA, New York, NY.

How did Hirshfield come to be admired by the most sophisticated artists and collectors of his time, despite his lack of academic training and access to elite culture? Its meteoric rise is certainly not due to the imprimatur of the Brooklyn Museum. In fact, the pieces – and their creator – so baffled the curator that he sent it back to Hudson Walker, a gallery on West 57th Street, for an appraisal.

Unimpressed, the gallery owner dismissed the canvases, planning to return them to the museum. He was “confused,” Meyer said in an interview. “Was Hirshfield an artist that people should see? Or an amateur slipper maker? He didn’t know he was both.

By chance, a collector by the name of Sidney Janis, also a stranger to the art world (former vaudevillian and shirt-maker), came across the paintings in the gallery and was so struck by them that he became the indefatigable Hirshfield promoter.

Morris Hirshfield (1872, Poland–1946, United States) Tiger, 1940. Oil on canvas, 28 x 39 7/8 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Fund, 1941, 328.1941. © 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for the Estate of Morris Hirshfield / Licensed by VAGA to Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.

Meyer himself remembers the “eye-opening” of first seeing Hirshfield’s work in person. “I never expected the stunning palette, vibrant patterns and weirdness of his paintings to come to life so fully. … The apparent naivety has given way to painterly precision. Material reality has been overwhelmed by the force of the artist’s imagination. Hirshfield’s subjects—many of them female figures, including nudes and fantastic animals—seem to float in unidentifiable space and are improbably composed and proportioned.

Meyer coined a term for the artist’s practice – “the textile imaginary” – and finds its source in Hirshfield’s intimacy with materials and textures as a pattern cutter and tailor in the “rag trade”. “. These “resurfaced in the wispy skies and woven waterfalls of his paintings,” writes Meyer. Hirshfield also had design experience as a very successful manufacturer of “foot appliances”, such as orthotics and boudoir slippers. Rather than limiting him, his unconventional background freed him from academic constraints.

Morris Hirshfield (1872, Poland–1946, USA), “Mother Cat with Kittens”, 1941. Oil on canvas, 61 x 91 cm. American Folk Art Museum, New York, gift of Patricia L. and Maurice C. Thompson Jr. and purchase with Jean Lipman Scholars Funds, 1998, 1998.5.1 © 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for the Estate of Morris Hirshfield / under license of VAGA at the Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.

Hirshfield’s work became a touchstone among the Surrealists, who were fascinated with the unconscious and dreams: they embraced him as a kindred spirit because of his otherworldly depictions of an inner reality. Breton, the leading theorist of surrealism, named Hirshfield as one of two painters (Edward Hopper was the other) whose “perspective informed by love and desire” would help “counter the nihilism and despair of the war”. Patron Peggy Guggenheim paid $900 for a Hirshfield nude in 1942 and only $75 for a Magritte the same year.

Yet Hirshfield was reviled by critics for his lack of training – dubbed “The Master of Two Left Feet” – and presented as ridiculously out of this world. Moreover, condescending and dismissive descriptions in the press of the Polish Jewish immigrant as a “character” of “the Brooklyn wilderness” with a “heavy Russian accent” reinforced the perception of him as a “primitive from the outside the borough”.

The solo exhibition created such a backlash that it was one of the main reasons for the MoMA director’s dismissal, and after that, writes Meyer, “self-taught painting was increasingly defined as a popular art and has become, as such, almost invisible in mainstream narratives of modernism.

Morris Hirshfield (1872, Poland–1946, United States), Stage Beauties, 1944. Oil on canvas, 40 x 48 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, gift of Carroll and Donna Janis, 2013.1118. © 2022 Robert and Gail Rentzer for the Estate of Morris Hirshfield / Licensed by VAGA to Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.

Meyer vehemently rejects the idea of ​​Hirshfield as “naïve”, saying that his success does not depend on his intention or self-understanding. What counts is rather the work itself and the “radiant force of its creativity”.

That the American Folk Art Museum is hosting the show seems unusual at first, given that the label “folk art” has been used to denigrate artists like Hirshfield. In fact, the venue is quite fitting, as the museum’s mission is to challenge the perceived divide between fine art and folk art, between amateurism and avant-garde.

Morris Hirshfield Rediscovered
September 23, 2022–January 29, 2023
American Folk Art Museum
2 LINCOLN SQUARE (66th and Columbus Avenue)
Free entry

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Maurizio Cattelan is on a mission to make this Wisconsin artist a household name https://russellchatham.com/maurizio-cattelan-is-on-a-mission-to-make-this-wisconsin-artist-a-household-name/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 20:29:47 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/maurizio-cattelan-is-on-a-mission-to-make-this-wisconsin-artist-a-household-name/ To most people who saw him around Milwaukee, Eugene Von Bruenchenhein (1910-1983) made his living working at a flower shop and then at a bakery. After developing a respiratory problem, probably due to exposure to flour dust, he stopped working at the age of 49 and lived on social security. Yet Von Bruenchenhein had a […]]]>

To most people who saw him around Milwaukee, Eugene Von Bruenchenhein (1910-1983) made his living working at a flower shop and then at a bakery. After developing a respiratory problem, probably due to exposure to flour dust, he stopped working at the age of 49 and lived on social security.

Yet Von Bruenchenhein had a very different life behind closed doors: he was a prolific, self-taught multimedia artist. In addition to taking racy photographs of his wife Marie, he produced vibrant, spooky paintings fusing ideas about nature, geopolitics, science fiction, and the apocalypse. He also built small sculptures from chicken bones.

Von Bruenchenhein’s work went unrecognized during his lifetime, and repeated attempts to attract the attention of local dealers were met with silence. It was not until after his death, when a family friend introduced his work to a curator at the Milwaukee Museum of Art, that his vast body of work began to attract attention.

Now Von Bruenchenhein has found another unlikely champion: Maurizio Cattelan. The Italian artist has teamed up with Marta Papini, artistic organizer of Cecilia Alemani’s Venice Biennale “The Milk of Dreams” exhibition, to organize a presentation of Von Bruenchenhein’s work at the stand of the Andrew Edlin Gallery at the Outsider Art Fair in Paris. Held at the Atelier Richelieu, a short walk from the Louvre, this is the tenth edition of the fair, which runs from September 16-18.

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, No. 795, April 10, 1959 (1959). KAWS collection.

Cattelan has been fascinated by Von Bruenchenhein’s work since discovering it at a group exhibition in Chelsea many years ago. “His paintings impressed my memory in the same way that light does with the film of an old camera.”Cattelan told Artnet News. “I couldn’t stop thinking about them.”

Meanwhile, Edlin, who is also CEO of Outsider Art Fair, said, “Maurizio loves this area and has been at our fair for as long as I can remember. His enthusiasm for Eugene Von Bruenchenhein was unmistakable when he came to see our last solo exhibition of his work at the gallery” in December 2020.

On display at Edlin’s stand are nine paintings that Von Bruenchenhein produced between 1956 and 1960. Although at the time his audience was limited to his immediate family and friends, the artist numbered and dated all of them. canvases, recording the exact day in oblique, looping writing. through the picture. He painted frantically, often completing a work in a single day. This inspired Cattelan to bring historical context to the presentation by displaying each work below the first page of The New York Times from that same date.

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, ,i>Untitled (September 19 – 65) (1965).  Photo courtesy of the Outsider Art Fair.” width=”1024″ height=”822″/></p>
<p id=Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, Untitled (September 19 – 65) (1965). Photo courtesy of the Outsider Art Fair.

“Recently, I saw an exhibition of conceptual art from the 1960s which made me think that Von Bruenchenhein’s work could be read in this sense; he dated each painting to the exact day, as On Kawara had done all his life,” Cattelan explained. “When I spoke to Andrew Edlin about it, he suggested that we put on a show that would suggest that interpretation.”

Cattelan’s idea of ​​associating paintings with New York Times allows us to see what issues preoccupied Von Bruenchenhein at the time. For instance, Genius Wand, November 5, 1956 depicts concentric circles in rippling pink, green, yellow and cream exploding into the night sky above the arcades of arches. The headlines of The New York Times November 5, 1956, report on Britain and France invading Egypt “by air” during the Suez Crisis. Von Bruenchenhein’s disturbing painting could be read as a meditation on the threat of the airstrike to Egyptian heritage.

This painting is also the only one on sale in the exhibition. Priced at €65,000, it is one of the most expensive pieces at the fair, where many works are in the four-figure range. Edlin sourced Von Bruenchenhein’s other paintings from private collections; five of them belong to the artist KAWS.

Sometimes the link to the first pages of The New York Times must. No. 535, January 1, 1957– a dynamic painting with dragon-like creatures amid swirling abstract elements – does not seem tied to any specific current event. Meanwhile, atomic age (No. 887, December 4, 1960)which represents a flaming mushroom, seems to recall the first French nuclear test, whose code name Blue Jerboafrom February 1960.

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, Atomic Age (No. 887, December 4, 1960) (1960).  Joshua Rechnitz collection.

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, Atomic Age (#887, December 4, 1960) (1960). Joshua Rechnitz collection.

Also on offer are several drawings, priced at €12,000 each, and photographs, including a black and white portrait of Marie shirtless and gazing lovingly at the lens, priced at €6,000. A self-portrait on loan from the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, is displayed alongside a similarly styled portrait of Mary. “I don’t think Von Bruenchenhein would have been so prolific without Marie”said Cattelan.

Indeed, Von Bruenchenhein is perhaps best known for his pin-up photographs of Marie. A selection of these images appeared in the exhibition “Alternate Guide to the Universe” at Hayward Gallery in 2013. That same year, several of the artist’s futuristic paintings appeared in the Venice Biennale’s central exhibition, “The Encyclopedic Palace,” curated by Massimiliano Gioni. Von Bruenchenhein’s work was the subject of a solo exhibition at the American Folk Art Museum in New York, which opened in 2010.

It is the coherence of Von Bruenchenhein’s visual language that appeals to Papini. “What I find fascinating about his practice is the visual consistency despite the diversity of media he has adopted”, she said. “Whether it is paintings or bone sculptures, photographs or clay vessels, one can always see a Red string that connects one room to another, as if they were designed to live together.

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, No. 849, January 6, 1960 (1960).  KAWS collection.

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, No. 849, January 6, 1960 (1960). KAWS collection.

Nevertheless, Von Bruenchenhein is still considered a foreign artist, which Cattelan is extremely keen to address. “I believe he was an outsider only because no one let his job be in the art world” official “before his death, even though he strove for this kind of recognition all his life”said Cattelan. “It’s so sad that I feel like we have to fix it. I wish he could see how much his work is loved now.

The market has also warmed up. Although Von Bruechenhein’s work is still relatively rarely sold at auction – only 31 of his works have ever sold, according to the Artnet price database – his prices are climbing. His auction record of $47,500 was set in February at Christie’s New York for a small 1958 oil painting, which far exceeded the high estimate of $30,000.

On a personal note, Cattelan added: “I wish I had half his determination and his self-confidence. He was so convinced of what he was doing that he didn’t stop and give up. I’m very insecure all the time, and looking at my work, I see a lot of mistakes and things I’d like to change. I don’t think my work has anything to do with his and that’s probably what fascinates me the most.

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Hudson Hall Presents “The Enigmatic Artists of the Hudson Valley” https://russellchatham.com/hudson-hall-presents-the-enigmatic-artists-of-the-hudson-valley/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 04:26:10 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/hudson-hall-presents-the-enigmatic-artists-of-the-hudson-valley/ Photographer Pete Mauney’s work explores the erratic and surreal systems of fireflies, whose bioluminescence is translated into pulsing green color fields through the artist’s camera. Photo by Pete Mauney, courtesy of Hudson Hall. Hudson, NY— As summer draws to a close and the autumnal equinox approaches, transition abounds in the natural world. Although evolving, the […]]]>

Photographer Pete Mauney’s work explores the erratic and surreal systems of fireflies, whose bioluminescence is translated into pulsing green color fields through the artist’s camera. Photo by Pete Mauney, courtesy of Hudson Hall.

Hudson, NY— As summer draws to a close and the autumnal equinox approaches, transition abounds in the natural world. Although evolving, the phenomenon is far from enigmatic. In fact, the arrival of autumn in the northern hemisphere is marked by abundant light: September 22 is one of only two days when the sun, placed directly above the equator, apparently divides the night and day in equal parts (hence the etymology of the word equinox, which derives from the Latin for “equal night”). As locals are well aware, daylight hours will decrease significantly by the winter solstice, the shortest and by extension darkest day of the year.

Alas, I digress.

The timing is nonetheless fortuitous for a trio of upstate artists who, drawing inspiration from the beauty of the Hudson Valley to create unique works of art that embody the complexity of the natural world, are part of of a joint exhibition at Hudson Hall.

“Enigmatic Artists of the Hudson Valley” – featuring the work of Lois Guarino, Stan Lichens, Pete Mauney – stems, in its genesis, from careful observation. Whether it’s a response to surreal systems of fireflies, the slow decay of the river’s edge, or an exploration of the interconnectedness of all life on earth, each artist brings the natural world to the forefront in his respective works, regardless of the chosen medium, each of which differs from the next.

Photographer Pete Mauney’s work explores the erratic and surreal systems of fireflies, whose bioluminescence is translated into pulsing green color fields through the artist’s camera. Based in the Hudson Valley, Mauney finds concentrations of regional populations of individual and mixed fireflies and attempts to capture not only their mass but also their “temporary ubiquity” through long exposures to the insects’ self-generated light. “Flash patterns, seemingly random travel patterns, unpredictability and overwhelming beauty are the experience,” he says while pointing out the real benefit: “I was lucky enough to capture some reflections of this experience with my cameras.

Lois Guarino takes a decidedly different approach, first painting, then assembling, canvas mosaic squares to create powerful visual statements. His largest work to date, “The Wonder Wall”, comprises 1000 separate paintings. “I’m a multimedia artist and a student of the Human Being program, which includes a deep reverence for animals,” says Guarino, who uses oil paint “to create images that explore the interconnectedness of all life on earth. and our origins in the complex, mysterious universe.

For two decades, Stan Lichens enjoyed walks along the Hudson River; in the years that followed, he noticed a gradual rise in the height of the river and its slow destruction of trees and shoreline habitat. The decision to document this phenomenon using photogrammetry – a process using software to create 3D shapes of objects photographed from multiple angles – resulted in myriad models made using a 3D printer coupled with environmentally friendly corn resin that has been meticulously coppered and patinated.

Hudson Hall, a historic and iconic building housing the oldest surviving theater in New York State, has long hosted artists from the area and beyond. Frederic Church and Sanford Gifford (first and second generation Hudson River School artists, respectively) exhibited paintings there in the 19th century; Albany-born writer Bret Harte read poems; “Blind Tom” Wiggins filled the house with his piano virtuosity; Henry Ward Beecher delivered a rousing abolitionist lecture; Susan B. Anthony has visited three times; and Teddy Roosevelt entertained a crowd. The current exhibition, which opened on September 2, will be on view until November 22.

REMARK: Programming at Hudson Hall is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts, with support from the Governor and Legislature of New York. To plan your visit and view the organization’s full COVID-19 policy, visit this link.

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Alex McGarry’s Andover Art Gallery celebrates its anniversary https://russellchatham.com/alex-mcgarrys-andover-art-gallery-celebrates-its-anniversary/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/alex-mcgarrys-andover-art-gallery-celebrates-its-anniversary/ AN award-winning artist has thanked Andover BID as her art gallery in the city celebrates its third anniversary, thanks to an initial rent-free period that helped her get the studio started. Alex McGarry, a professional wildlife artist specializing in oil paintings of British wildlife and birds, opened his studio in Andover in September 2019 when […]]]>

AN award-winning artist has thanked Andover BID as her art gallery in the city celebrates its third anniversary, thanks to an initial rent-free period that helped her get the studio started.

Alex McGarry, a professional wildlife artist specializing in oil paintings of British wildlife and birds, opened his studio in Andover in September 2019 when Andover BID and David Mellor Jewelers teamed up to provide an “exceptional opportunity” opening a business in the town of Andover. center.

The partnership offered a rent-free period at the start of a lease of the former David Mellor Jewelers store in Waterloo Court. The opportunity was seized by Alex.

Alex said: “This rent-free period has been absolutely crucial in enabling me to set up a studio and an art gallery.

“It gave me the breathing room to build a clientele downtown and ‘get the ball rolling’. Without this opportunity, my gallery simply wouldn’t be a reality. I am extremely grateful to both Andover BID and David and Christine from David Mellor Jewelers.

In 2019, she received the prestigious title of best British artist of the year awarded by the Fine Art Trade Guild.

Many of her paintings have been released in limited editions and she is represented by Britain’s largest distributor of original artwork and fine art prints – De Montfort Fine Art.

His paintings can be found in galleries across the UK, including on board luxury cruise ships such as the Queen Mary II.

Prior to September 2019, Alex painted at home in a studio that was not open to the public and had done so for the previous eight years. While happy to be a full-time artist, Alex always dreamed of having her own gallery, open to the public. Three years later, Alex’s gallery continues to thrive and grow year after year.

Andover BID said it continues to support Alex and all the wonderful businesses in downtown Andover; organizing events, engaging Town Rangers, marketing campaigns, supporting individual events with live social media videos and providing storefront improvement grants some stores.

BID Director Steve Godwin said, “We are proud to have been part of Alex McGarry’s success and to offer continued support.

“We are passionate about downtown Andover; Andover BID is here to encourage and support any business with a vision to succeed and grow in the city. We have many established and new independent businesses and encourage more to come to the city. It’s easy to look around at big cities and towns, believing they have something we don’t have, which, while perhaps partly true in terms of cathedrals and large shopping malls , but Andover has so many other benefits.

“It is convenient and accessible and provides opportunities for entrepreneurs who want to succeed. People can come by car or by train, and our bus station is in the city center with the train station just 10 minutes walk away. Alex McGarry has worked hard to grow the business, she is a wonderful addition to the city, and we wish her continued success.

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The 16th Annual Frolic on Franklin is Saturday, September 17 – Clarksville Online https://russellchatham.com/the-16th-annual-frolic-on-franklin-is-saturday-september-17-clarksville-online/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 19:00:09 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/the-16th-annual-frolic-on-franklin-is-saturday-september-17-clarksville-online/ Clarksville, TN – Historic downtown Clarksville is gearing up for the 16th Annual Frolic on Franklin: A Celebration of the Arts to be held Saturday, September 17, 2022 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Coordinated by the Roxy Regional Theater, this free event will showcase the works of more than two dozen artists, host entertainment […]]]>

Clarksville, TN – Historic downtown Clarksville is gearing up for the 16th Annual Frolic on Franklin: A Celebration of the Arts to be held Saturday, September 17, 2022 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Coordinated by the Roxy Regional Theater, this free event will showcase the works of more than two dozen artists, host entertainment and art demonstrations – all along the 100 block of Franklin Street.




A variety of original works of art, as well as handicrafts, will be on display, including paintings and photographs, jewelry, clay garden items, woodwork, handbags and scarves, pottery , candles, jewelry, woven and knitted items and seasonal gifts. Items will be on sale with prices ranging from $2.00 to $500.00.

A crowd favorite is to see and often participate in artist demonstrations. Several kiosks will offer the opportunity to learn techniques directly from the artists throughout the day.

This year’s vendor list includes the following:

Art by Donald Groves and Kris Lee
Photography / Oil Paintings

ECSC
Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts at APSU

Cilla’s jewelry
Handmade jewelry with birthstone and chainmaille

DCThomas
Paintings / Art Prints / Handmade Jewelry / Wall Decor / Textile Art

John Sass
Custom Denim Jackets from Recycled Materials / Needle Felted Creatures

Downtown artists’ cooperative
Ceramics / Jewelry / Wooden items and more

feed and live
Watercolor Paints / Learning Cards and Matching Games

Grain and Honey Bakery
Baked Goods / Acrylic Canvas Paintings / Prints


John Sharp Art
Photorealistic Paintings / Limited Edition Prints

KC Creations
Acrylic Paints / Mixed Media Art / Resin Accents

Keesa
Original prints and figures

KnightArt5
Small Sculptures / Prints / Paintings

Laetitia
Handwoven Jewelry / Bracelets / Necklaces / Pendants

Ma Moore’s – It’s a family story
Images / Door Hangers / Home Decor / Porch Approaches

Made by Adelaide
Gold filled and sterling silver jewelry

Martin Freeman
Charcoal Drawings / Paintings / Prints

maylee baby
Soy wax candles / melted waxes / car air fresheners

Peaceful City Art
Acrylic Paintings on Canvas / Pieces of Woodwork


The Picklepot
Sterling Silver and Steampunk Jewelry

Suzanne’s soaps
Handmade decorative soaps

Swirlz Art Studio
Painting demonstrations

tail feather + co
Handcrafted sustainable products

Twisted Creations
Handmade Bears / Tutus / Jewelry

In addition to artist booths, a performance area located at the corner of Franklin Street and First Street will feature live entertainment throughout the day, including the Cumberland Winds Jazz Project (9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.), Red River Breeze (10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.) and the Stuart Bonnington Trio (noon – 1:00 p.m.).

Frolic on Franklin sponsors include Fortera Credit Union, Richview Family Dentistry, Clarksville/Montgomery County Arts & Heritage Development Council, F&M Bank, Legends Bank, Planters Bank and the Roxy Regional Theater.


Downtown stores and restaurants will be open for regular Saturday hours. The downtown market is also open in the public square until 1:00 p.m.

For more information about Frolic on Franklin, visit www.roxyregionaltheatre.org/frolic.

About Roxy Regional Theater

The Roxy Regional Theater (Roxy Productions, Inc.) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to professional theater production and the promotion of the arts, with an emphasis on education, Clarksville, Central Tennessee and the Southeast. The theater is located at 100 Franklin Street in historic downtown Clarksville. For more information, visit www.roxyregionaltheatre.org.

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Obituary: Joseph Earl Wolfred Nadeau https://russellchatham.com/obituary-joseph-earl-wolfred-nadeau/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 05:01:01 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/obituary-joseph-earl-wolfred-nadeau/ Joseph Comte Wolfred Nadeau AUGUSTA – Joseph Earl Wolfred Nadeau, 90, died August 29, 2022 in Augusta. He was born on September 12, 1931 to Marguerite and Earl Nadeau. Joe was a longtime resident of Waterville. He attended schools in Winslow and Oak Grove Colburn. He served in the US Airforce as a crew chief […]]]>

Joseph Comte Wolfred Nadeau

AUGUSTA – Joseph Earl Wolfred Nadeau, 90, died August 29, 2022 in Augusta. He was born on September 12, 1931 to Marguerite and Earl Nadeau.

Joe was a longtime resident of Waterville. He attended schools in Winslow and Oak Grove Colburn. He served in the US Airforce as a crew chief and was a longtime member of the VFW and Elks clubs. He worked many years as a carpet and tile installer for Kings Linoleum in Waterville, as well as the Maine Central Railroad.

Joe was passionate about painting. He created many oil paintings which will now be treasured by his family and friends.

He also enjoyed exploring Maine and beyond with his beloved wife, Barb. One of their favorite vacation spots was Destin, Florida, where they spent at least two months a year.

Joe was predeceased by his wife, Marilyn Barbara Elliot Nadeau; and his daughter, Jennifer Marie Nadeau Mayott.

He is survived by his sister, Diane Pelletier of Winslow, her husband, Rodney, and their four children.

He is survived by his two sons, Gregory Scott Nadeau and Lori Baxter, of Waterville and Scarborough, and Christopher Earl Nadeau and his wife, Mary Szwerluga Nadeau, of Tampa Fla.

He is survived by his son-in-law, Robert Mayott of Syracuse, NY

He leaves behind five grandchildren, Joseph Gregory Nadeau and Katrina Pirtel of Augusta, Robert Mayott and Julia Mayott of Syracuse NY, Kiele and Paul Nadeau-Marquez, Krista and Ronald Reid-Nadeau of Florida.

He is also survived by two great-grandchildren, Payton Marilyn Nadeau and Mase Reid-Nadeau; as well as several nieces and nephews.

There will be a funeral service at the Maine Veterans Cemetery in August on Friday, September 30 at 12 p.m.

Arrangements are in the care and direction of Veilleux and Redington Funeral Home. Fond memories and expressions of sympathy can be shared at http://www.VeilleuxFuneralHome.com for the Nadeau family.


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Cameron University professor’s painting selected for juried art exhibition | Community News https://russellchatham.com/cameron-university-professors-painting-selected-for-juried-art-exhibition-community-news/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://russellchatham.com/cameron-university-professors-painting-selected-for-juried-art-exhibition-community-news/ Country the United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic […]]]>

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